If "Mom" Were A Paid Profession... How Much Money Would You Have Earned in 2018?

If “Mom” Were a Paid Profession… How Much $$$ Would YOU Have Made In 2018?

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Moms, you have the hardest and the lowest paying job in the world. You are NEVER off the clock, you get no holidays off or paid vacation time, none of the traditional working benefits, no HR department to back you up, no handbook.

And you do it all for $0 per hour, $0 per year.

But what if you did get paid for everything you do?

What would that paycheck look like?

To find out, let’s assess these 13 “jobs” that all fall into the daily life of a mom and how much those careers pay.

(I used salary.com for all of my data unless otherwise specified)

Comment Below- How much money would be “worth it” to you for all the work you do as a mom if you were considering making “mom” your chosen career?

1) Nurse

Moms are the nurse of the family. We have to know how to diagnose common illnesses, what remedies to try, how to administer medication, and how to have great bedside manner with our little patients.

Besides all that, we are constantly on call for the job of nurse. If our child is sick at 2am, we’re out of bed taking care of him. If our kid is throwing up at school, we leave our day jobs to go pick her up.

How much do nurses earn?

There is quite a range. Pediatric nurse practitioners also work specifically with children. The average salary for entry level pediatric nurse practitioners is $102,545.

On the other end of the spectrum, a school nurse (who also specializes in working with children) makes an average of $49, 088.

2) Chef

person cutting vegetables with knife

Moms are chefs at home. They are the primary meal planner- in charge of creating a menu, taking inventory of what food is available, purchasing any necessary ingredients, preparing the food, and making good use of the leftovers.

It could be argued that parents also do the job of Server ($27,308) and Nutritionist ($60,467), but just to be conservative we’ll stick with chef.

But for simplicity sake, we’ll stick with chef. The average chef earns $45,396 per year.

3) Chauffeur

How much driving do you think a parent does every day? It’s a ton! Between all the different lessons and activities our kids are involved in (sports, music, dance, gymnastics, church, clubs, student council, etc.) not to mention just getting to school, I feel like I’m living out of the car.

There are days that we pack dinner to eat on the go just because we know there isn’t going to be time to drive home and eat between the kids’ different appointments. Moms are definitely chauffeurs.

The average chauffeur earns $33,417 per year.

4) Mediator/Judge

brown wooden gavel

Moms and Dads are constantly helping their children solve problems. This could be problems between you and the child, problems between two of your children, or problems between a child and their friends.

There are times when parents do the job of a judge- which is to listen to both cases, review the rules of the family, and make a decision about who was right and who was wrong. This almost always comes with administering some sort of punishment to the guilty party. It’s not a pleasant job.

Judges earn a whopping $162,653 per year! And they deserve every penny. Being a judge is rough.

Mediators are a little different.

Interestingly, they are paid less than a judge although mediating in a family can be more complex and involved than judging in a family.

Mediation involves listening to both sides using reflective listening techniques and guiding a conversation between the two parties to help them come to a reasonable solution on their own. Rather than judging where you are the final say, in mediation the goal is to have both parties agree on a plan of action. This is especially difficult when dealing with two parties who are angry with each other, and sometimes angry with you.

Mediators are paid an average of $64,174 annually.

(https://www.indeed.com/salaries/Mediator-Salaries)

5) Bookkeeper/Accountant

Parents have a lot of behind the scenes work to make a home run smoothly and effectively.

One important job they do every day is managing the family finances. This is comparable to a bookkeeper or an accountant. Moms and dads earn money, track expenses, complete tax forms, and budget.

The salary ranges depending on experience and education. A Bookkeeper ($42,015 per year) has more basic knowledge and skills rather than an Entry Level Accountant ($51,284 per year) who has more specialized training.

6) Professional Organizer

white ceramic bottles on shelf

Moms are constantly organizing. It’s the job of the parents to keep the living space livable– which means implementing all the life hacks that they can find to simplify the day to day juggle.

Moms find creative ways to store all their children’s items, like toys, backpacks, shoes, lunchboxes, video games, etc.

They also get clever about how to fit all the necessities of life into small spaces, making the most of the room that they have. It’s an amazing thing to see!

Professional organizers make $42,825 per year on average.

(https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Professional_Organizer/Hourly_Rate)


Other Great Reads: 

25 Best Mom Hacks that Save Time, Energy, and Money

10 Best Hair Styles for Mom on a Busy School Morning

AMAZING Miracle of Moms- Let’s All Be That Mom Every Day

Fill Yourself- Balancing Parent Life and Personal Life


 

7) Cosmetologist

Moms and dads are in charge of their children’s appearance, at least before the kids are old enough to do their own hair and choose their own clothes.

This involves a lot beyond just running a comb through each child’s hair.

Moms and dads wash, cut, and style their children’s hair. They paint fingernails. They even dress the kids.

The average cosmetologist earns $27,278.

(https://www.ziprecruiter.com/Salaries/Cosmetologist-Salary)

8) Interior Design

four orange, green, blue, and red paint rollers

Parents are responsible for the general appearance and ambiance in their home.

When done well, this makes a big difference in quality of life.

Parents can design a home to promote fun, creativity, education, and relaxation. For example, a parent decides if there is a reading area in their home, if there are educational toys, if the wall colors encourage relaxation, if the children get a say in the design of their room, etc. There are endless possibilities!

Interior designers average $45,198 per year.

9) Photographer

It’s the parent’s job to catch all the wonderful moments in daily life and on special occasions. They are the photographer. It’s up to them to take pictures that will remind each other of the fun and happiness that we experienced as a family.

That’s no small task, and so important! It would be tragic to miss or forget the amazing details of childhood.

Photographers typically make $63,154.

10) Housekeeper

person holding two white towels

A housekeeper is similar to a maid. The job includes duties like doing laundry, tidying, deep cleaning and disinfecting, washing dishes, and making beds.

It’s important to know tricks to get stains out of clothes, how to clean carpets when kids pee on them, which cleaners are most effective for each surface in your home, and what chemicals are harmful to children.

Housekeepers average $25,091 per year.

11) Life Coach/Counselor

Moms and dads are constantly offering helpful advice to get their children through life’s learning process. This is one job of a parent that continues even after your children move out of the house.

You are called upon when your kids are disappointed by a bad grade, when a friend lets them down, when they go through a breakup, when they lose a job, when they move schools and miss their friends, when they don’t get along with their peers, when they experience bullying, when they make mistakes.

Your job is to offer emotional support, wisdom, and guidance.

You help them work through their feelings and guide them to find their own solutions.

A life coach typically earns $46,285 and a family support counselor earns about $38,926.

(https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Life_Coach/Hourly_Rate)

12) Purchaser/Merchandise Buyer

person holding basket filled with vegetables

Shopping is a never-ending chore for parents. Of course, I don’t mean the fun kind of shopping where you get cute new clothes. I mean grocery shopping. No fun.

Most businesses hire a purchaser, who is in charge of keeping warehouses and businesses stocked with essential items. That means everything from their top selling item to the toilet paper in the bathroom.

Moms do that too. We keep our homes stocked with everything from ketchup to batteries to shaving cream.

Purchasers earn approximately $91,360 per year.

13) Teacher or Teacher Aide  

All parents act as teacher aids. They are in charge of helping the child understand the concepts taught at school so that the child can successfully complete his homework. It’s not easy to explain and teach without just giving away answers.

Teacher’s Aids make $22,367 per year.

Some elite parents home school their kids. They take on the full role of teacher. That means you have all the duties of a teacher’s aid, but you also have to plan lessons, implement lessons, research various ways to present the information, test your child’s understanding, and meet the education criteria provided by your state.

I admire parents who can do all that because it’s a ton of work in addition to the regular workload of a parent!

Teachers make around $56,289 annually.

two babies and woman sitting on sofa while holding baby and watching on tablet

Moms, you’re priceless. But every once and a while, it’s nice to see a price anyways. 😊

I know, I probably forgot something…. The list is just so endless. You could include recreation management, pharmacist, tutor, car mechanic, seamstress, fashion designer, landscaper… There’s so much that parents do every day, there’s just no way to include every “job” a mom does.

 

Using the jobs listed above, let’s add all the salaries just for fun to see what the salary for all those roles combined would be!

Now, I know, adding a bunch of salaries isn’t exactly how a mom’s worth should be calculated because you have to control for factors like education requirements, professional experience, professional training, and special skills… Another limitation is that moms might spend much less time per job because they have so many total jobs to do rather than devoting a 40 hour workweek to each thing. For example, I spend about 7 hours per week helping my kids with their hair, but a cosmetologist spends 40 hours per week helping people with that.

Blah blah blah.

I know this number doesn’t mean much, But just for fun, let’s do it! We’ll get around to a more realistic dollar amount later.

All together… Mom jobs’ salaries combined equals….

$565,198 per year!!!!

 

Woo Hoo!!! And by the way, that’s going off of the lowest salaries combined- for example, there is a range in what accountants vs bookkeepers earned, so we used the salary for bookkeeper since it was lower. Just to be safe. So a mom’s salary could be even higher than that!

Again, this is a little bit of an unrealistic number because of various factors that need to be accounted for but WHO CARES???

It’s just nice to know that our work really is worth something!

 

Ok, I did promise a more accurate number.

I did find some awesome people who are smarter than me who did some accurate math to account for education, experience, etc. and the result was a more reasonable salary.

A mom’s (real and accurate) salary in 2018 should have been…..

$162,581!!!

 

person writing dollar sign on sketch book

Still good, but I like the first number better.

Comment Below- How much money would be “worth it” to you for all the work you do as a mom if you were considering making “mom” your chosen career?

 

Thanks for having some fun with me today looking into what a mom is “worth”. Seriously, there isn’t a number that accurately reflects all the love and patience and sacrifice you do every day.

But it is weirdly nice to know that we are worth a lot. What we do really is hard, despite all those haters who ask “What do moms do at home all day?” They might not understand all the jobs you moms do every day, but I do.

Keep it up! You’re amazing.

Sincerely,

Mrs. S

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Vital Lessons to Teach Children About Finances Before Age 7

A Millionaire in the Making- 5 Vital Lessons to Teach Children About Finances Before Age 7

Did you enjoy this post? Share the Love!

 

This post may contain advertisements and/or links for products and services that I value. I offer recommendations to products and/or services that I find helpful in my own life as a mom. I may receive a commission based on viewer purchases or interactions with these ads. You will NOT be charged any extra money. All prices will stay the same for you whether your purchase items/services through links found on this site or not! 

Updated 2/9/2019

Every parent wants to raise a child to be a responsible adult.

One of the biggest challenges for parents is teaching kids how to use their money wisely. The ability to do this will determine if your child can:

  • budget to get through college,
  • provide for their family,
  • get a house,
  • stay out of unnecessary debt,
  • if they are comfortable or stressed,
  • and if they are in control of their lives.

The importance of teaching children about money cannot be over-stressed.

So how do you teach a child to be smart with his or her money?

Preparation For Parents: Get in the Right Mindset

First- Parents, let’s level with each other.

Money and kids are tough topics to discuss together. That’s because money is kind of a tough, unforgiving fact of life. And it’s your baby that we’re talking about!

It can be difficult for parents to ask their kids to do anything, well, difficult. Like deal with money.

Remember that you have a limited time to teach your child necessary skills before they are thrown to the cold, heartless world. Either you can teach them what they need to know, or life will teach them. And life is a B!*&#.

woman crossing highway during nighttime

It’s much better for your child to learn from you, not from life. You love them, you’re patient, you can give them second chances. Life won’t show any love or patience. They might get second chances, but only with extreme consequences- like bankruptcy, bad credit, and debt.

Lots of people assume that teaching about money can wait until their kids are older. After all, who wants to think about money beyond the day to day grind of saving, earning, and spending?

But, don’t waste time! Research shows that children form money habits by 7 years old. (See ‘Habit Forming and Learning in Young Children’, Dr. David Whitebread and Dr. Sue Bingham)

Let me say that again…. 7 years old!!

That’s no time at all! And the impact is huge- it will affect the rest of their lives!

So let’s get started.

Click the image below for great resources by Dave Ramsey on teaching children about responsible finances!
Financial Peace Junior Kit: Teaching Kids How to Win With Money

Junior’s Adventures: Storytime Book Set

Lesson 1: Money is Hard to Get

  • Common Mistake #1: Many parents shell out money to their kids even when the child hasn’t earned it. 

Allowances are the worst and most obvious example of this. From my point of view, an allowance is being paid just for living. No work necessary. Just stay at home, do nothing, and get paid. \

Is anyone going to pay you for inhaling and exhaling as an adult? Not at all! So don’t teach your kids that this is part of life. It’ll be confusing and frustrating when they get to the real world and realize that they have to work hard.

Some people might say that they’ll give an allowance now, and adjust to working hard for money as the child gets older. Here’s the problem with that:

  1. Kids are set in their money habits by age 7, according to research. (See ‘Habit Forming and Learning in Young Children’, Dr. David Whitebread and Dr. Sue Bingham)
  2. The child is going to resist that change, because it’s easier to get an allowance than to work hard. You’ll have an uphill battle ahead of you when you try to change a system that you created.

Instead, teach them to work hard now, in age appropriate ways. person holding coins

  • Common Mistake #2: Many parents give too much money for too little work. 

Parents, how hard do you work for your money? Pretty darn hard!

Parents, how much time do you put in for your money? A lot!

Kids aren’t ready for an adult level of time and effort, but they do need to be prepared for the level of energy and time that they will be expected to invest into making a living as an adult.

Giving children a lot of money for an easy task isn’t helpful. It’s better than giving them money for doing nothing, but it still teaches kids that money is easy to get. And it isn’t. Your job isn’t easy, is it?

Don’t adults get paid less if the job requires less skill? Or less time? Flipping burgers pays less than being a doctor. And that’s ok. Mimic this concept in your child’s life.

Find an appropriate task that challenges your child.

Don’t pay based on the task that a child completes. Pay based on how difficult the task was for the child. More time and effort=more money. The greater the challenge, the greater the compensation.

On the flip side, the easier the task, the less he gets for it.

Teach new skills that the child will need to earn greater amounts of money.

The first lesson for a child to learn is that hard work pays.

Don’t trust your kids to keep track of real money yet? Try using these educational tools! Click the image below!
Melissa & Doug Classic Play Money Set, Developmental Toys, 50 of Each Denomination, Wooden Cash Drawer, 17.75″ H x 10.25″ W x 1.25″ L

Digital Coin Bank Savings Jar by DE – Automatic Coin Counter Totals all U.S. Coins including Dollars and Half Dollars – Original Style, Clear Jar

Lesson 2: The Money You Have is Limited

  • Common Mistake 3: If the child doesn’t have enough money for something they really want, I’ll just buy it for them.

Is anyone going to bail your child out as an adult every time he can’t afford something? No! So don’t do it now. Remember, we’re mimicking real life in a more loving environment.

Teach your child that he has to wait and save for purchases. If he doesn’t save, he can’t get things he wants.

person holding pink ceramic pig coin bank

  • Common Mistake 4: If the child is going to make an impulse buy or is going to spend his money on something he’ll regret later, I’ll stop him from making the purchase in order to save him from the pain later on. 

Let the child make choices and get excited about what they want to buy.

When they get distracted by potential impulse buys, remind them of their end goal. Remind them that if they purchase something now, they won’t have the money they need for the thing that they really want.

Talking through purchases like this makes your child conscious of the choices that he or she is making instead of simply responding to his own whims.

BUT- if a child insists on purchasing something impulsively, allow this to be a learning opportunity. Don’t just save him from making a mistake. This will reinforce your teaching about saving money when the child realizes that he can’t afford something he wants later because he spent the money now.

Money hurts sometimes. It’s much better for a child to feel it buying Legos rather than experiencing this pain for the first time when he’s upside-down in a home loan.

Let a little pain happen now to avoid big pain later.

Don’t bail out your child because he’s a little sad right now. Let him learn.

Click the image below for a great resource to teach your kids about money!
Learning Resources Money Bags Coin Value Game

Learning Resources Buy It Right Shopping Game

Exact Change (2Nd Edition)

Winning Moves Games Pay Day, The Classic Edition

Dave Ramsey’s ACT Your Wage! Board Game

Lesson 3: Money is not Guaranteed

  • Common Mistake 5: Money just keeps flowing from mom and dad with no end. Even if the kid is working for it, he assumes that he has hit a bottomless well that he can dip into at any time that he wants.

focus photography of person counting dollar banknotes

A while back, I heard this story about a young family.

The oldest 3 children wanted to participate in swimming lessons during the summer. It is a great goal, and something the family had done previously.

The only problem is that swimming lessons cost $50 per child, and the family was in a tougher financial position then they had been in previous years. They simply did not have $150 to send all 3 children to swim lessons.

When the parents tried to explain to the children that there was no money for swimming lessons, the kids quickly asked “Can we work for it? We can clean in the house, or we can do things in the yard!”

The parents had to explain that, although they would love to pay the children for doing jobs around the house, there really was no money. The parents could not pay them even for working.

It would be easy to end the story here. Sad kids, no swim lessons. Still a good lesson in finances. But these were good thoughtful parents who didn’t let things stop there.

Although the children were young, the parents talked to friends, family, and neighbors to see if the children could do odd jobs around their homes to earn a few bucks here and there.

With new avenues available to earn money, the parents and kids got to work. Thanks to a combined family effort, the kids were able to earn the money for their swim lessons even though their parents did not have the cash at the time.

This is a tough experience for everyone, but it taught the children that you can’t put your eggs in one basket.

Children who assume that money is an endless well turn into adults who make purchases before they can afford them, counting on that bonus that they’ll get next quarter. Of course, we know that that bonus might not come or it might be needed elsewhere by the time next quarter rolls around.

These are adults who get into massive credit card debt or who fail to save money for hard times.

They assume that because they have a job now, they will always have that income. Jobs come and go. Income is not for sure.

Help children learn to that they must have the cash in hand before they can make purchases. No parents’ credit for kids. No debt. And if they want to be able to buy things they will need in the future, they should have a glass jar or a piggy bank to put money aside in.

Lesson 3 to teach children- Money is no guarantee. Have savings. Don’t buy until you have cash. Avoid debt.

Click the image below!
Jhua Cartoon Piggy Bank Password Electronic Money Bank Safe Saving Box ATM Bank Safe Locks Panda Smart Voice Prompt Money Piggy Box for Children (Blue)

TOPBRY Cartoon Electronic Password Piggy Bank Cash Coin Can for Children/Toy Gifts Birthday Gifts (Pink & White)

Money Savvy Pig – Blue

Money Savvy Pig – Purple

Lesson 4: Money can be Used for Good or Bad

  • Common Mistake 6: Teach kids the nitty gritty about money and forget about the ethics.

Once you become a responsible adult, you have responsibilities to your community.

Give back. Help others out. Serve your community. Be a friend and a neighbor.

Do good things with your money.

person showing both hands with make a change note and coins

That’s the only way to have a positive focus about your money. People who are focused on what their money can do for them become greedy and desensitized to others’ needs.

Teach your kids to be generous by finding a reasonable way for them to share what they have. They can give a dollar to a charity or a church, they can donate to a hospital, they can buy a small gift for someone else at Christmas.

Teach children to be giving.

Click the image below for great resources on teaching your child to save, share, and invest!
Colorful Stacking Block Coin Bank For Kids – Helps Kids Save, Share, Give and Invest – Transparent Plastic Bank Shows Cash Inside – Teaches Good Money Habits – Perfect As Kids Birthday Presents

Money Scholar Classic Sports Bank: The Piggy Bank that Teaches Kids to Save, Invest, Give & Spend Wisely

Stephen Joseph Spend, Save and Share Bank, Owl

Save Spend Share Money Jar | Three-Part Money Tin Teaches Kids Financial Management – Deposit Coins and Bills

Giantsuper Smart Beast Trio Piggy Bank: 3-in-1 Money-Wise Educational Piggy Bank …

Giantsuper Trio! Smart Coin Bank: 3-in-1 Money-Wise Educational Piggy Bank

Lesson 5: Show Kids What it Looks Like

  • Common Mistake 7: Try to teach my kid to be better than I am willing to become myself.

None of this works without a good example to look up to.

If parents aren’t willing to do all these things for themselves- avoid debt, save money, avoid impulse buys, be generous to others, wait for things you want- then the kids won’t internalize it.

Show your child what these habits look like in daily life.

person picking blue card

Point out when you do something right and why you made that choice. Don’t be afraid to teach them when you make a mistake too. We don’t need to hide our failures from our kids. If kids are allowed to see us mess up and fix our mistakes, they won’t have unrealistic expectations for themselves to be perfect, and hopefully they will learn from your mistake rather than making the same mistake themselves.

Teach the ultimate lesson on finances by being in control of your own money.

Keeping It Age Appropriate

One of the greatest challenges about teaching finances is approaching an adult topic in a child-friendly and age-appropriate way.

Those things might seem contradictory. You can accomplish both by thinking a real life adult situation that you want to teach (like money) and simplifying it.

It’s like instead of baking a cake from scratch, you are giving your kid a cake mix in a box. It’s simpler, it fits their level of understanding, but it also gets the job done in a real way.

Still have questions? Take advantage of one of these great books that will help you teach your child about money! Click the image below!

Make Your Kid A Money Genius (Even If You’re Not): A Parents’ Guide for Kids 3 to 23

Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

Teach Your Child To Fish: Five Money Habits Every Child Should Master

Have fun with your little entrepreneurs as they earn their first money and make their first purchases!!!

Sincerely,

Mrs. S

Share this post with any parent who is trying to raise a child to be a responsible adult!

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